NSX-T Troubleshooting IDFW rules

So you have migrated to NSX-T 3.2 and you are using IDFW rules to allow users to dynamically gain access when they log in to any physical device in the domain.

Only trouble is that now it is not really working, and VMware did not yet implement a way in the gui to see the effective members of Groups that contains Active Directory members.

Well there is a way you can see who is in the group at least, but there are a couple of steps.

How to find the effective group members

Step one is to identify the rule you are troubleshooting. Make a note of the rule id.

Next find the host the destination VM is running on. You can do this manually in vCenter or use powershell. That’s up to you.

Continue reading NSX-T Troubleshooting IDFW rules

NSX-T Traffic Analysis Traceflow fails

So you are trying to do a traceflow to see where the traffic is going, but as it turns out it is not working. If this is the case, and if you are running NSX-T 3.2, and the segment that your VMs belong to is VLAN backed. Then I might have a solutions for you.

ERROR

Traceflow request failed. The request might be cancelled because it took more time than normal. Please retry.Error Message: Error: Traceflow intent /infra/traceflows/<guid> realized on enforcement point /infra/sites/default/enforcement-points/default with error Traceflow on VLAN logical port LogicalPort/<guid> requires INT (In-band Network Telemetry) to be enabled (Error code: 500060)
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Reconnect ESXi host after reinstall

After a VMware ESXi host reinstall reconnecting your host is not as easy as changing the state of the host by using the Set-VMHost -State command in VMware PowerCLI. The reason is that your host has gotten a new certificate. So to do this scripted you need to retrieve the SSL thumbprint and specify that during the reconnect.

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Enable IPv6 using PowerCLI

This is a PowerCLI script to enable IPv6 on VMware ESXi hosts in you vCenter.

This problem is that disabling IPv6 in newer versions of ESXi can sometimes result in PSOD, so even if you are not using IPv6 in your environment, you should keep it enabled. https://kb.vmware.com/s/article/2150794

Import-Module VMware.PowerCLI

Connect-VIServer <Insert vCenter name>

$VMHost = Get-VMHost <insert hostname>

$esxcli = Get-EsxCli -VMHost $VMhost -V2
$argument = $esxcli.system.module.parameters.set.CreateArgs()
$argument.module = "tcpip4"
$argument.parameterstring = "ipv6=1"
$esxcli.system.module.parameters.set.Invoke($argument)
Write-Host "IPv6 Enabled for host: $($VMHost)"
Write-Host "You need to put the host in maintenance mode and reboot for changes to take effect."

Hope this helps you. Keep in mind that use of this script is entirely your responsibility, and you should always understand what a script does before you run it.

To detect which host that has IPv6 disabled check this post: https://vm.knutsson.it/?p=1193

Check if IPv6 is disabled

This is a PowerCLI script to list VMware ESXi host that has IPv6 disabled in you vCenter.

This problem is that disabling IPv6 in newer versions of ESXi can sometimes result in PSOD, so even if you are not using IPv6 in your environment, you should keep it enabled. https://kb.vmware.com/s/article/2150794

Import-Module VMware.PowerCLI

Connect-VIServer <Insert vCenter server FQDN>
$VMHosts = Get-VMHost | Sort-Object

foreach ($VMHost in $VMHosts) {
    if ($VMHost.ConnectionState -ne "Connected" ) { 
        $status = "Unknown. Host Status: $($VMHost.Connectionstate)"
        Write-host("$($VMHost): $($status)")
    } else {
        $value = ($VMHost | Get-VMHostModule tcpip4).Options
        if ($value -match "ipv6=1") {
            $status = "Enabled"
            #Write-host("$($VMHost): $($status)")
        } elseif ($value -match "ipv6=0") {
            $status = 'Disabled'
            Write-host("$($VMHost): $($status)")
        } else {
            $status = "Unknown"
            Write-host("$($VMHost): $($status) - $($value)")
        }
    }
}

Hope this helps you. Keep in mind that use of this script is entirely your responsibility, and you should always understand what a script does before you run it.

To enable IPv6 on hosts using PowerCLI check this post: https://vm.knutsson.it/?p=1198

Automating VMware Workstation LAB

I am often working with quite large test environments. Powering on ESXi hosts with nested VMs can be a pain when you need to get it running quickly.

Here are some of my tricks to automating VMware Workstation

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Nested or Native

Should you buy dedicated hardware or a OP workstation for you next testing environment. If you are not sharing it with others, this might be useful for you.

History

For many years now VMware Workstation has been my secret weapon an daily tool for just about everything in regards to customer remote connections, test environments as so on.

Recently I needed to do some advanced testing with NSX-V and NSX-T. This required a lot more power than what I normally use so I needed to upgrade my testing platform.

The consideration is always with these things. How much are you going to invest, and what are the benefits. For a long time I have been considering buying 4 Intel NUC PC’s for doing these tests, but the problem is that to get a real setup that is flexible you need to invest a lot. Also it is not very flexible as you need to maintain them, and reinstall them everytime you need to play with a newer or older version.

Continue reading Nested or Native

PowerCLI: TPM Encryption Recovery Key Backup

FromvSphere 7.0 Update 2 and onwards VMware encurage you to make a backup of your host encryptions keys, when you are using TPM. https://kb.vmware.com/s/article/81661

Here is a script that will make it easy for you if you cannot be bothered with logging in to each host using SSH.

The script will list all hosts and their keys for safe keeping.

Import-Module VMware.PowerCLI
Connect-VIServer <vCenter>

$VMHosts = get-vmhost | Sort-Object

foreach ($VMHost in $VMHosts) {
    $esxcli = Get-EsxCli -VMHost $VMHost
    try {
        $key = $esxcli.system.settings.encryption.recovery.list()
        Write-Host "$VMHost;$($key.RecoveryID);$($key.Key)"
    }

    catch {
        
    }
}

PowerCLI: Migrate DRS VM Group Members

When ever you need to migrate to from one vCenter instance to another there are lots of things you need to migrate.

This PowerCLI script will help you migrate members from one DRS VM group to another. It can easily be modified to be part of a bigger context, or migrate all groups available.

Prerequisites

The prerequisites are that you have both the new and the old vCenter running, and that you have disconnected you hosts in the old vCenter and connected them to the new one. Do NOT remove them from you old vCenter. Leave them disconnected.

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